Coordinator's Column Welcome affiliates to the spring 2015 edition of SIG 6's Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders: Research and Diagnostics. As professionals in hearing and listening difficulties, we are often the first contact for clients experiencing difficulty listening in noise, following directions, remembering verbal messages, and/or using verbal information at ... Coordinator's Column
Coordinator's Column  |   April 01, 2015
Coordinator's Column
Author Notes
Article Information
Coordinator's Column
Coordinator's Column   |   April 01, 2015
Coordinator's Column
SIG 6 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders: Research and Diagnostics, April 2015, Vol. 19, 3. doi:10.1044/hhd19.1.3
SIG 6 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders: Research and Diagnostics, April 2015, Vol. 19, 3. doi:10.1044/hhd19.1.3
Welcome affiliates to the spring 2015 edition of SIG 6's Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders: Research and Diagnostics. As professionals in hearing and listening difficulties, we are often the first contact for clients experiencing difficulty listening in noise, following directions, remembering verbal messages, and/or using verbal information at work, at school, or in social settings. We administer behavioral and/or electrophysiological tests of hearing and middle ear function, discovering normal peripheral auditory function. So, now what? As audiologists—responsible for evaluating auditory function from outer ear to cortex—we must familiarize ourselves with those conditions that can create auditory complaints in the absence of demonstrable peripheral hearing impairment. Our first issue of 2015 offers you four papers discussing just such conditions. Jeanane Ferre provides an overview of central auditory processing assessment and intervention among listeners with normal peripheral function. The auditory sequalae associated with mild traumatic brain injury are discussed by Eric Hoover, Pam Souza, and Frederick Gallen. Helen Pryce discusses a fascinating syndrome—King-Kopetzky syndrome—that presents with normal hearing and auditory difficulties that may or may not be true auditory processing disorder; while Garreth Prendergast, Hannah Guest, and Christopher Plack examine relations among cochlear neuropathy, hidden hearing loss, and obscure auditory dysfunction.
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The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.