Competing Views on Abnormal Auditory Results After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Traumatic brain injury affects the lives of millions of Americans. Within audiology, there is general agreement that mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) can result in long-term auditory processing deficits. However, this agreement is not shared across disciplines. In this paper, recent studies on the effects of MTBI on auditory function ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2015
Competing Views on Abnormal Auditory Results After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Eric C. Hoover
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL
  • Pamela E. Souza
    Roxelyn and Richard Pepper Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
  • Frederick J. Gallun
    VA RR&D National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research, Portland VA Medical Center, Portland, OR
  • Financial Disclosure: Eric C. Hoover is post-doctoral fellow at the University of South Florida. Pamela E. Souza is a professor at Northwestern University. Frederick J. Gallun is a research investigator at Portland VA Medical Center. Research funded by Northwestern University Roxelyn and Richard Pepper Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders and the National Institute of Deafness and other Communication Disorders R01 DC60014.
    Financial Disclosure: Eric C. Hoover is post-doctoral fellow at the University of South Florida. Pamela E. Souza is a professor at Northwestern University. Frederick J. Gallun is a research investigator at Portland VA Medical Center. Research funded by Northwestern University Roxelyn and Richard Pepper Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders and the National Institute of Deafness and other Communication Disorders R01 DC60014.×
  • Nonfinancial Disclosure: Eric C. Hoover has previously published in the subject area. Pamela E. Souza has previously published in the subject area. Frederick J. Gallun has previously published in the subject area.
    Nonfinancial Disclosure: Eric C. Hoover has previously published in the subject area. Pamela E. Souza has previously published in the subject area. Frederick J. Gallun has previously published in the subject area.×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Articles
Article   |   April 01, 2015
Competing Views on Abnormal Auditory Results After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury
SIG 6 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders: Research and Diagnostics, April 2015, Vol. 19, 12-21. doi:10.1044/hhd19.1.12
SIG 6 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders: Research and Diagnostics, April 2015, Vol. 19, 12-21. doi:10.1044/hhd19.1.12

Traumatic brain injury affects the lives of millions of Americans. Within audiology, there is general agreement that mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) can result in long-term auditory processing deficits. However, this agreement is not shared across disciplines. In this paper, recent studies on the effects of MTBI on auditory function are reviewed in the context of competing opinions on the interpretation of neurosensory deficits after MTBI. Three hypotheses are presented that explain auditory test results as they relate to post-traumatic stress disorder, subtle cognitive deficits resulting from MTBI, and physiological damage to temporal processing in the auditory system.

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