Vestibular Evaluation and Management With Cochlear Implantation The benefits of cochlear implants (CIs) have been well documented since the first CI gained Federal Drug Administration approval in 1984. Early criteria were strict regarding the degree and/or etiology of hearing loss required for candidacy and the selection of the ear for implantation which was initially unilateral only. ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2014
Vestibular Evaluation and Management With Cochlear Implantation
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Steven M. Doettl
    Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Knoxville, TN
  • Kristine D. Lassen
    The Balance and Hearing Center at the University of Tennessee Medical Center, Knoxville, TN
  • Alison L. Whittle
    Children’s Ear, Nose, and Throat Specialists, PLLC, Knoxville, TN
    Pediatric Cochlear Implant Program, East Tennessee Children’s Hospital, Knoxville, TN
  • John P. Little
    Otolaryngology, Children’s Hearing Center, Knoxville, TN
    Pediatric Cochlear Implant Program, East Tennessee Children’s Hospital, Knoxville, TN
  • Financial Disclosure: Steven M. Doettl is an Audiologist, Clinical Assistant Professor, and Dizziness Clinic Coordinator at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center. Kristine D. Lassen is a Physical Therapist at The Balance and Hearing Center at the University of Tennessee Medical Center. Alison L. Whittle is a Pediatric Audiologist with Children’s Ear, Nose, and Throat Specialists, PLLC and the Coordinating Audiologist for the Pediatric Cochlear Implant Program at East Tennessee Children’s Hospital. John P. Little is Pediatric Otolaryngologist with Children’s Ear, Nose, and Throat Specialists, PLLC and the Cochlear Implant Surgeon for the Pediatric Cochlear Implant Program at East Tennessee Children’s Hospital.
    Financial Disclosure: Steven M. Doettl is an Audiologist, Clinical Assistant Professor, and Dizziness Clinic Coordinator at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center. Kristine D. Lassen is a Physical Therapist at The Balance and Hearing Center at the University of Tennessee Medical Center. Alison L. Whittle is a Pediatric Audiologist with Children’s Ear, Nose, and Throat Specialists, PLLC and the Coordinating Audiologist for the Pediatric Cochlear Implant Program at East Tennessee Children’s Hospital. John P. Little is Pediatric Otolaryngologist with Children’s Ear, Nose, and Throat Specialists, PLLC and the Cochlear Implant Surgeon for the Pediatric Cochlear Implant Program at East Tennessee Children’s Hospital.×
  • Nonfinancial Disclosure: Steven M. Doettl has previously published in the subject area. Kristine D. Lassen has no nonfinancial interests that conflict with this article. Alison L. Whittle has no nonfinancial interests that conflict with this article. John P. Little has previously published in the subject area.
    Nonfinancial Disclosure: Steven M. Doettl has previously published in the subject area. Kristine D. Lassen has no nonfinancial interests that conflict with this article. Alison L. Whittle has no nonfinancial interests that conflict with this article. John P. Little has previously published in the subject area.×
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Balance & Balance Disorders / Articles
Article   |   April 01, 2014
Vestibular Evaluation and Management With Cochlear Implantation
SIG 6 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders: Research and Diagnostics, April 2014, Vol. 18, 11-15. doi:10.1044/hhd18.1.11
SIG 6 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders: Research and Diagnostics, April 2014, Vol. 18, 11-15. doi:10.1044/hhd18.1.11
The benefits of cochlear implants (CIs) have been well documented since the first CI gained Federal Drug Administration approval in 1984. Early criteria were strict regarding the degree and/or etiology of hearing loss required for candidacy and the selection of the ear for implantation which was initially unilateral only. Over the last 30 years, advancements in electrode design, processor design, processing strategies, surgical techniques, and mapping strategies have resulted in increased user success opening the opportunity for broader candidacy criteria resulting in significant growth in cochlear implantation. These advancements have made CIs an integral part of the hearing healthcare landscape for newborns to adults.
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