Auditory Dysfunction Among Long-Term Consequences of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI) The rates of concussion or mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) are increasing, and audiology is one of the many fields in which increased attention is being paid to this major public health concern. Though many individuals recover rapidly from mTBI, a significant number of these individuals continue to experience debilitating ... Article
Article  |   July 01, 2012
Auditory Dysfunction Among Long-Term Consequences of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI)
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kathy R. Vander Werff
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY
  • Disclosure: Kathy R. Vander Werff has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Kathy R. Vander Werff has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Articles
Article   |   July 01, 2012
Auditory Dysfunction Among Long-Term Consequences of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI)
SIG 6 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders: Research and Diagnostics, July 2012, Vol. 16, 3-17. doi:10.1044/hhd16.1.3
SIG 6 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders: Research and Diagnostics, July 2012, Vol. 16, 3-17. doi:10.1044/hhd16.1.3

The rates of concussion or mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) are increasing, and audiology is one of the many fields in which increased attention is being paid to this major public health concern. Though many individuals recover rapidly from mTBI, a significant number of these individuals continue to experience debilitating problems for months and years after injury. Auditory problems such as tinnitus, dizziness, and difficulty processing auditory information are among the common long-term symptoms reported. In this article, the author reviews mechanisms of possible injury and the evidence for peripheral and central auditory problems following mTBI. In addition, the author considers the potential influences of cognitive and psychological factors on the auditory problems reported in this population. Although there is a need for further research, audiologists have an important role as part of a team of professionals in the diagnosis and rehabilitation of long-term problems following mTBI.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by National Institutes of Health/National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIH NIDCD R03-DC010246). The author thanks Leah Allen, Renee Cloutier, Kaitlyn Coscione, and Claire Pietrzak for their assistance with manuscript preparation.
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