Music Perception of Cochlear Implant Recipients and Implications for Counseling and (Re)habilitation Next to improved spoken communication, satisfactory music perception and enjoyment is the second most common aspiration of cochlear implant (CI) recipients (Gfeller et al., 2000). This article provides an overview of research regarding music perception of CI recipients. The author characterizes perceptual acuity and appraisal (sound quality) for structural attributes ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2012
Music Perception of Cochlear Implant Recipients and Implications for Counseling and (Re)habilitation
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kate Gfeller
    School of Music, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Iowa Cochlear Implant Clinical Research Center, Department of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA
  • Disclosure: Kate Gfeller has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Kate Gfeller has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2012
Music Perception of Cochlear Implant Recipients and Implications for Counseling and (Re)habilitation
SIG 6 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders: Research and Diagnostics, December 2012, Vol. 16, 64-73. doi:10.1044/hhd16.2.64
SIG 6 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders: Research and Diagnostics, December 2012, Vol. 16, 64-73. doi:10.1044/hhd16.2.64

Next to improved spoken communication, satisfactory music perception and enjoyment is the second most common aspiration of cochlear implant (CI) recipients (Gfeller et al., 2000). This article provides an overview of research regarding music perception of CI recipients. The author characterizes perceptual acuity and appraisal (sound quality) for structural attributes of music (pitch, timbre, rhythm) as influenced by technical characteristics of the device, characteristics of the CI user, and training. These research findings will be related to practical aspects of music enjoyment in everyday life, speech in conjunction with music, and general CI benefit.

Acknowledgment
Portions of this paper were supported by grant 2 P50 DC00242 from the NIDCD, NIH; grant 1R01 DC000377 from the NIDCD, grant RR00059 from the General Clinical Research Centers Program, NCRR, NIH; and the Iowa Lions Foundation. Thanks are due to Virginia Driscoll for assistance in the preparation of this manuscript.
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