Functional Brain Dynamics of Evoked and Event-Related Potentials From The Central Auditory System Source localization of electrical activity in the brain can be greatly improved by testing the experimental variability in the signals being localized. The most widely used method for extracting evoked potential (EP) signals from the EEG is averaging. Averaging multiple EEG epochs suppresses background noise, revealing EP components that are ... Article
Article  |   February 01, 2010
Functional Brain Dynamics of Evoked and Event-Related Potentials From The Central Auditory System
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Phillip M. Gilley
    Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Science, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO
  • Anu Sharma
    Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Science, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Articles
Article   |   February 01, 2010
Functional Brain Dynamics of Evoked and Event-Related Potentials From The Central Auditory System
SIG 6 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders: Research and Diagnostics, February 2010, Vol. 14, 12-20. doi:10.1044/hhd14.1.12
SIG 6 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders: Research and Diagnostics, February 2010, Vol. 14, 12-20. doi:10.1044/hhd14.1.12
Abstract

Source localization of electrical activity in the brain can be greatly improved by testing the experimental variability in the signals being localized. The most widely used method for extracting evoked potential (EP) signals from the EEG is averaging. Averaging multiple EEG epochs suppresses background noise, revealing EP components that are time and phase locked to the stimulus event. However, averaging also obscures information about inter-trial variability and reveals little, if any, information about event related spectral perturbations (ERSPs) in the time-frequency plane. Recent advances in signal processing have led to advanced methods for examining single-trial contributions to the evoked potential. These include methods for describing both phase locked and non-phase locked activity. When combined with multi-channel recordings of the EP, modeling of the underlying dynamic brain signals provides information about the variance and nature of the EP components. The ability of these dynamic, single-trial analyses to reveal complex changes in the EP response makes them suitable for examining the physiology and pathophysiology of the central auditory system. In this perspective, we describe and provide examples of three current methods for extracting EP signals from the EEG and discuss their application to both experimental and clinical research.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by the National Institutes of Health, NIH grant R01DC0657 to author A.S.
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