Our Emerging Interest in the Interaction of Hearing, Aging, and Cognition for Speech Perception Cognitive Hearing Science (Arlinger, Lunner, Lyxell, & Pichora-Fuller, 2009), is a new area of interdisciplinary study that proposes to examine the interaction between hearing and cognition. This area of study has evolved to help address conflicting reports revealing that cognition declines may or may not be present with increasing age, ... Article
Article  |   November 01, 2010
Our Emerging Interest in the Interaction of Hearing, Aging, and Cognition for Speech Perception
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Marcia J. Hay-McCutcheon
    Department of Communicative Disorders, The University of Alabama Speech and Hearing Center, Tuscaloosa, AL
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Articles
Article   |   November 01, 2010
Our Emerging Interest in the Interaction of Hearing, Aging, and Cognition for Speech Perception
SIG 6 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders: Research and Diagnostics, November 2010, Vol. 14, 39-45. doi:10.1044/hhd14.2.39
SIG 6 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders: Research and Diagnostics, November 2010, Vol. 14, 39-45. doi:10.1044/hhd14.2.39
Abstract

Cognitive Hearing Science (Arlinger, Lunner, Lyxell, & Pichora-Fuller, 2009), is a new area of interdisciplinary study that proposes to examine the interaction between hearing and cognition. This area of study has evolved to help address conflicting reports revealing that cognition declines may or may not be present with increasing age, and that decreased hearing sensitivity with age may or may not solely account for deteriorating speech perception performance. Presently, much work is underway with the help of theoretical frameworks (i.e., the Common Cause Hypothesis, the Information Degradation Hypothesis, the Sensory Deprivation Hypothesis, the Cognitive Load on Perception Hypothesis, and the Ease of Language Understanding model) to identify how cognition and hearing interact during communication. One clinical population of interest for studying the interaction of cognition and hearing is profoundly deaf adults who have had their hearing partially corrected via a cochlear implant. Preliminary evidence from such a group has revealed that older implant recipients have more difficulty discriminating different talkers, which could be attributed to declines associated with age and temporal processing as opposed to cognitive declines. With further interdisciplinary work it will be possible to more fully explain the interaction between hearing and cognition for adults with and without hearing loss.

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