Sound-Field and Personal FM: Technologies to Assist Children With Normal Hearing in the Classroom The appropriate recognition of speech in a classroom is essential for maximum academic achievement. Unfortunately, numerous populations of children with normal hearing, such as children with learning, reading, language, attentional and/or auditory processing disorders, can experience difficulties understanding speech in typical classroom noise and reverberation levels (see Crandell, Smaldino, ... Article
Article  |   May 01, 2003
Sound-Field and Personal FM: Technologies to Assist Children With Normal Hearing in the Classroom
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Brian M. Kreisman
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Carl C. Crandell
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Joseph J. Smaldino
    Department of Communicative Disorders, University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / School-Based Settings / Articles
Article   |   May 01, 2003
Sound-Field and Personal FM: Technologies to Assist Children With Normal Hearing in the Classroom
SIG 6 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders: Research and Diagnostics, May 2003, Vol. 7, 17-20. doi:10.1044/hhd7.1.17
SIG 6 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders: Research and Diagnostics, May 2003, Vol. 7, 17-20. doi:10.1044/hhd7.1.17
The appropriate recognition of speech in a classroom is essential for maximum academic achievement. Unfortunately, numerous populations of children with normal hearing, such as children with learning, reading, language, attentional and/or auditory processing disorders, can experience difficulties understanding speech in typical classroom noise and reverberation levels (see Crandell, Smaldino, & Flexer, 1995). One strategy for reducing the deleterious effects of inappropriate classroom acoustics in such normal-hearing populations is the use of Frequency Modulation (FM) technologies. This article will present an overview of the various types of FM systems that can be used in the classroom setting for children with normal hearing.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 6 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders: Research and Diagnostics content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.