Auditory Processing in School-Age Children: Can't Hear, Remember, or Understand; What's the Difference? In the absence of factors usually accompanying language deficits (e.g., hearing loss, neuropathology, cognitive impairment), children with language impairment (LI) have a difficult time learning school-appropriate language skills. Children with LI are a heterogeneous group, making up approximately 7% of the school-age population (Leonard, 1998). Another heterogeneous group of ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2002
Auditory Processing in School-Age Children: Can't Hear, Remember, or Understand; What's the Difference?
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jeffrey A. Marler
    Department of Audiology and Speech Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2002
Auditory Processing in School-Age Children: Can't Hear, Remember, or Understand; What's the Difference?
SIG 6 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders: Research and Diagnostics, October 2002, Vol. 6, 10-12. doi:10.1044/hhd6.2.10
SIG 6 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders: Research and Diagnostics, October 2002, Vol. 6, 10-12. doi:10.1044/hhd6.2.10
In the absence of factors usually accompanying language deficits (e.g., hearing loss, neuropathology, cognitive impairment), children with language impairment (LI) have a difficult time learning school-appropriate language skills. Children with LI are a heterogeneous group, making up approximately 7% of the school-age population (Leonard, 1998). Another heterogeneous group of children with learning difficulties are those with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). It is also estimated that as many as 6% of school-age children meet the diagnostic criterion for ADHD (Barkley, 1997). In addition, numerous researchers have reported significant overlaps in symptomatology of ADHD, LI, and central auditory processing disorders (CAPDs; Jerome, 2000; Tannock & Schachar; 1996). The reason for introducing these specific clinical populations and reporting their incidences is not to make the reader’s eyes glaze, nor is it necessary to confirm whether you were sent the wrong Special Interest Division newsletter. Rather, the purpose is to highlight the challenging opportunities facing the pediatric audiologist who must distinguish between the sensory, perceptual, and cognitive factors imbedded in auditory processing diagnostics when evaluating school-age children. Today, as many school districts across the country come under increasing pressure to identify, differentiate, and remediate children and adolescents with these diverse symptoms, the audiologist can be either a dynamic contributor or a marginalized team member (Harris, 1996).
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