Estimating Hearing Thresholds in Infants Using Auditory Steady-State Responses A critical stage in the process of detecting hearing loss in infants is the initial audiological examination (Joint Committee on Infant Hearing [JCIH], 2000). The primary goals of the evaluation are (a) to confirm that hearing loss exists and then (b) to determine the available options for intervention. Achieving both ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2002
Estimating Hearing Thresholds in Infants Using Auditory Steady-State Responses
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Craig A. Champlin
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Texas at Austin
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Articles
Article   |   April 01, 2002
Estimating Hearing Thresholds in Infants Using Auditory Steady-State Responses
SIG 6 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders: Research and Diagnostics, April 2002, Vol. 6, 9-11. doi:10.1044/hhd6.1.9
SIG 6 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders: Research and Diagnostics, April 2002, Vol. 6, 9-11. doi:10.1044/hhd6.1.9
A critical stage in the process of detecting hearing loss in infants is the initial audiological examination (Joint Committee on Infant Hearing [JCIH], 2000). The primary goals of the evaluation are (a) to confirm that hearing loss exists and then (b) to determine the available options for intervention. Achieving both of these objectives requires accurate measurement of auditory sensitivity. Because the newborn’s behavioral repertoire is limited, estimates of hearing threshold must be obtained using electrophysiological methods. In fact, for nearly 25 years, the auditory brainstem response (ABR) has been used in conjunction with tone-burst signals to characterize an infant’s audibility function, at least from 500–4000 Hz (for a review, see Stapells, 2000). However, another evoked potential, known as the auditory steady-state response (ASSR), has emerged that may prove useful for evaluating the auditory status of infants and young children (Cone-Wesson, 2001). This review article briefly describes the ASSR method and considers its advantages relative to the ABR. For more in-depth coverage of threshold prediction using ABRs and ASSRs, see the recent book chapter by Sininger and Cone-Wesson (2002) .
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