Cochlear Implant Research: Overview, Current and Future Trends A cochlear implant is a device that provides sound to a person who has a profound hearing loss. The sound provided is not typical of normal, acoustic hearing in that electrical pulses stimulate auditory neurons, rather than the cochlear mechanics involving the basilar membrane and hair cell activity. Some ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2001
Cochlear Implant Research: Overview, Current and Future Trends
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lendra Friesen
    Department of Auditory Implants and Perception, House Ear Institute, Los Angeles, CA
  • Qian-Jie Fu
    Department of Auditory Implants and Perception, House Ear Institute, Los Angeles, CA
  • Monita Chatterjee
    Department of Auditory Implants and Perception, House Ear Institute, Los Angeles, CA
  • John J. Galvin, III
    Department of Auditory Implants and Perception, House Ear Institute, Los Angeles, CA
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2001
Cochlear Implant Research: Overview, Current and Future Trends
SIG 6 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders: Research and Diagnostics, October 2001, Vol. 5, 5-7. doi:10.1044/hhd5.1.5
SIG 6 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders: Research and Diagnostics, October 2001, Vol. 5, 5-7. doi:10.1044/hhd5.1.5
A cochlear implant is a device that provides sound to a person who has a profound hearing loss. The sound provided is not typical of normal, acoustic hearing in that electrical pulses stimulate auditory neurons, rather than the cochlear mechanics involving the basilar membrane and hair cell activity. Some patients perform similarly to normal hearing individuals, and many are able to communicate with one another over the telephone.
The device consists of an implanted receiver and intra-cochlear electrode array, as well as an external headset, microphone, and speech processor. Sound is received by the microphone and delivered to the speech processor, which performs an acoustic analysis and digitizes the sound. The speech processor then communicates with the implanted part of the device via radio frequency signal, sending digitally encoded information about the parameters of electrical current to be delivered to the implanted electrodes. Once the signal is decoded, electrical pulses are delivered to the appropriate electrodes along the array, stimulating the surrounding nerve fibers in the cochlea.
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