A Listening Laboratory for Students Teaching strategies that actively engage students are the most effective. One manifestation of this position, at least in science education, is laboratory exercises. Students conduct experiments, and, in doing so, develop understandings and insights that could not be achieved via passive methods. Given this philosophy, it is logical to ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 1999
A Listening Laboratory for Students
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Craig A. Champlin
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, The University of Texas at Austin
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   October 01, 1999
A Listening Laboratory for Students
SIG 6 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders: Research and Diagnostics, October 1999, Vol. 3, 3-4. doi:10.1044/hhd3.1.3
SIG 6 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders: Research and Diagnostics, October 1999, Vol. 3, 3-4. doi:10.1044/hhd3.1.3
Teaching strategies that actively engage students are the most effective. One manifestation of this position, at least in science education, is laboratory exercises. Students conduct experiments, and, in doing so, develop understandings and insights that could not be achieved via passive methods. Given this philosophy, it is logical to expect that students of hearing science should conduct experiments, too.
The purpose of this article is to describe a computer program that allows students to perform one type of experiment—the measurement of auditory threshold. Auditory thresholds describe a listener’s hearing capability. As defined here, auditory threshold refers to the proportion of time that a listener reports detecting a given sound. There are several kinds of auditory thresholds. The absolute threshold refers to the detection of a sound in the quiet. The audiogram is a plot of absolute threshold measured at several different frequencies. The difference threshold pertains to the detection of dissimilarity between two audible sounds. Masked threshold refers to the detection one sound, the signal, when a competing sound, the masker, is present. Our program, which is called Thresh, can be used to measure either absolute or masked threshold.
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