An Australian Consortium for Diagnosis and Treatment of Auditory Neuropathy in Preverbal Children Throughout the history of clinical audiology, there have been reported cases of patients who experienced hearing difficulties, particularly speech perception deficits, that were out of proportion to their pure tone hearing thresholds. These findings were interpreted as being due to a retrocochlear, or more generally, a central auditory processing ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 1997
An Australian Consortium for Diagnosis and Treatment of Auditory Neuropathy in Preverbal Children
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Barbara Cone-Wesson
    The University of Melbourne, Australian Hearing ServicesMelbourne, Australia
  • Alison King
    The University of Melbourne, Australian Hearing ServicesMelbourne, Australia
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   October 01, 1997
An Australian Consortium for Diagnosis and Treatment of Auditory Neuropathy in Preverbal Children
SIG 6 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders: Research and Diagnostics, October 1997, Vol. 1, 2-5. doi:10.1044/hhd1.1.2
SIG 6 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders: Research and Diagnostics, October 1997, Vol. 1, 2-5. doi:10.1044/hhd1.1.2
Throughout the history of clinical audiology, there have been reported cases of patients who experienced hearing difficulties, particularly speech perception deficits, that were out of proportion to their pure tone hearing thresholds. These findings were interpreted as being due to a retrocochlear, or more generally, a central auditory processing disorder. Within the last few years, there have been reports in the literature showing patients with normal evoked otoacoustic emissions (EOAEs), absent or severely abnormal auditory brainstem responses (ABRs), audiograms that indicate thresholds ranging from normal to moderate degrees of hearing loss, and speech perception scores that were significantly poorer than would be expected on the basis of their audiogram. These patients have auditory impairments that are, presumably, retrocochlear-cochlear, or at least, retro-hair cell. Some of these patients had documented retrocochlear or neurologic disorders, such as acoustic neuroma, multiple sclerosis, Friedrich’s Ataxia and Charcot-Marie Tooth disease, or possible neuropathy due to hyperbilirubinemia in the newborn period. This cluster of symptoms has been termed auditory neuropathy; and infants, adults, and children exhibiting auditory neuropathy have been described by several research teams (Berlin et al., 1993; Deltenre et al., 1996; Sininger et al., 1995; Sininger & Starr, 1997; Starr et al., 1996, Stein et al., 1996).
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