Mechanisms of Otoprotection In a previous paper (Tuper, Ahmad, & Seidman, 2005), we considered the mechanisms of ototoxicity. The reader is encouraged to peruse this article, because it provides background information that may be helpful to understanding the current work. The focus of the present paper is on otoprotective agents, and we ... Article
Article  |   August 01, 2006
Mechanisms of Otoprotection
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nadir Ahmad
    Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI
  • Gale Tuper
    Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI
  • Michael Seidman
    Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Articles
Article   |   August 01, 2006
Mechanisms of Otoprotection
SIG 6 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders: Research and Diagnostics, August 2006, Vol. 10, 2-12. doi:10.1044/hhd10.1.2
SIG 6 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders: Research and Diagnostics, August 2006, Vol. 10, 2-12. doi:10.1044/hhd10.1.2
In a previous paper (Tuper, Ahmad, & Seidman, 2005), we considered the mechanisms of ototoxicity. The reader is encouraged to peruse this article, because it provides background information that may be helpful to understanding the current work. The focus of the present paper is on otoprotective agents, and we will provide an insight into the current understanding of the preventive and therapeutic strategies to combat ototoxicity. The concept of neuroprotection has generated increasing interest among clinicians and researchers and has led to extensive efforts to illuminate the mechanisms underlying this process. In a broad sense, neuroprotection is a process by which neuronal function is protected against potential insult or restored following injury. There are numerous causes of neuronal injury, including ischemic and neurodegenerative processes. When these injurious events affect the sensory neuroepithelial apparatus of the inner ear, the area is rendered susceptible to damage, expressed clinically as hearing loss, vertigo, and tinnitus. Thus, otoprotection can be viewed as those mechanisms that can specifically prevent, arrest, or reverse the development of inner ear damage. Several agents have been studied and used in clinical practice to afford otoprotection, some of which will be highlighted in this article.
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