Evidence-Based Practice in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Auditory Processing Disorders Under current scopes of practice with the ASHA, the speech-language pathologist (SLP) is charged with screening for APD (auditory processing disorder; ASHA, 2001), the audiologist (AuD) is charged with diagnosis of APD (ASHA, 2004), and both SLPs and AuDs may be involved in counselling and treatment. The Joint Coordinating Committee ... Article
Article  |   September 01, 2007
Evidence-Based Practice in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Auditory Processing Disorders
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Deborah Moncrieff
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Articles
Article   |   September 01, 2007
Evidence-Based Practice in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Auditory Processing Disorders
SIG 6 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders: Research and Diagnostics, September 2007, Vol. 11, 12-15. doi:10.1044/hhd11.1.12
SIG 6 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders: Research and Diagnostics, September 2007, Vol. 11, 12-15. doi:10.1044/hhd11.1.12
Under current scopes of practice with the ASHA, the speech-language pathologist (SLP) is charged with screening for APD (auditory processing disorder; ASHA, 2001), the audiologist (AuD) is charged with diagnosis of APD (ASHA, 2004), and both SLPs and AuDs may be involved in counselling and treatment.
The Joint Coordinating Committee on Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) of ASHA states that audiologists and speech-language pathologists must incorporate the principles of EBP into their clinical practices in order to provide the highest quality of care for all individuals. The principles of EBP are defined as “the conscientious, explicit, and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients” and involves “integrating individual clinical expertise with the best available external clinical evidence from systematic research” (Sackett, Rosenberg, Gray, Haynes, & Richardson, 1996, p. 71). ASHA has charged practitioners to consider evidence from three primary sources: presenting complaints from the individual, opinions of expert authorities, and high quality peer-reviewed research (2005) . The major change that EBP now demands is that patient perspectives and the opinions of authorities be considered only against a background of high quality, rigorous scientific studies (Dollaghan, 2004). The purpose of this review is to describe how current standards in the clinical diagnosis and treatment of APD compare to the requirements of EBP.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 6 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders: Research and Diagnostics content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.